HoC - Roll of Honour - Leslie Trice

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Private 242960 Leslie Trice

1st/5th Battalion the East Kent Regiment

Leslie Trice was born in 1892 and at the outbreak of the war lived at 60 Burnaby Gardens, having previously lived at 22 Whitehall Park Road. He lived with his parents Charles, a commercial traveller and his mother Edith. He had 2 sisters: Phylllis b1889, a nursery governess, and Constance aged 12. The family had close links with St Michael’s, Leslie’s father being a sidesman at the church.

Leslie had briefly been a pupil at Latymer Upper School and at the time of the 1911 census was employed as a clerk in a jeweller’s office. He enlisted in 1914 at Stamford Brook in the 10th Battalion Middlesex Regiment (no. 2449) and is listed in the ‘Chiswick Roll of Honour’ in the January 1915 edition of the local paper. At the time of his death he was a private in the 1st/5th Battalion of the Buffs (East Kent) Regiment (no. 242960).

In the September/October edition of the Parish Magazine Leslie is recorded as serving in Mesopotamia - modern day Iraq - the area having been occupied by the Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force in June 1915. Leslie died on 24th February 1917, the day the Turkish forces began to retreat from their 15 month siege of the town of Kut. He was mentioned at Holy Communion on 11th March 1917 and listed in ‘Beyond the Veil’ April 1917. Interestingly, his name is also on the roll of honour at St Nicholas Church, Chiswick Mall.

Leslie was buried in Amara War Cemetery. It is perhaps worth noting that Amara, a town on the left bank of the Tigress river, became a hospital centre eventually comprising no less than seven general and some smaller units. In 1933 the headstones in Amara War Cemetery had to be removed as due to the chemical composition of the soil they were suffering severe deterioration. They were replaced by a screen wall on which the names of the fallen were engraved. Sadly, at the present time, due to the delicate political situation which exists, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission is unable to maintain the cemetery in the usual way. However, volumes listing the war dead are held at their headquarters in Maidenhead and may be accessed by the public.